News

2/6/2018 - SALVATORE ARANCIO | NEW RELICS, THAMES-SIDE STUDIO GALLERY, ROYAL BOROUGH OF GREENWICH, LONDON, UK

Exhibition Dates: June 2nd -24th, 2018 Preview: Friday 1 June 2018, 6.30-8.30pm, all welcome. Special Artists' Opening Event: Saturday 9…

Exhibition Dates: June 2nd -24th, 2018

Preview: Friday 1 June 2018, 6.30-8.30pm, all welcome.

Special Artists' Opening Event: Saturday 9 June, 12-6pm, all welcome.

Curators' Talk: Saturday 9 June 2018, 3pm, all welcome.

 

New Relics

curated by Tim Ellis and Kate Terry

 

Salvatore Arancio, Vasilis Asmakopoulos, Andy Bannister, Olivia Bax, Dominic Beattie, Katie Bethune-Leamen, Hannah Birkett, Simona Brinkman, Daryl Brown, Hannah Brown, Bettina Buck, Clare Burnett, Matt Calderwood, Stewart Cliff, Lotti V Closs, Benjamin Cohen, Gary Colclough, Katie Cuddon, Blue Curry, Rosalind Davis, Alexander Devereux, Dexter Dymoke, Tim Ellis, Brian Griffiths, Lilah Fowler, Holly Hendry, Justin Hibbs, Fred Hunt, Andrea Jespersen, Paul Johnson, Ana Kazaroff, Vera Kox, Lucy LeFeuvre, Alan Magee, Eva Masterman, Ian Monroe, Rupert Norfolk, Roula Partheniou, Harrison Pearce, Mark Pearson, Chris Poulton, Frances Richardson, Michael Samuels, Alex Scarf, Zoe Schoenherr, Amy Stephens, Karen Tang, Kate Terry, Jonathan Trayte, Finbar Ward, Elaine Wilson, Sarah Kate Wilson, Andrea V Wright, Ben Woodeson

 

The term relic is used to describe something that has survived the passage of time, especially an object or custom whose original culture has disappeared, but also an object cherished for historical value such as a keepsake or heirloom……

 

New Relics presents a diverse range of contemporary positions in sculpture from a cross generational group of international artists. The exhibition demonstrates the multiple directions and potentials of sculpture and how it is continually shifting and being reinterpreted. The themes and concepts illustrated show the depth of the medium and the alluring power of materials to conjure new meanings and interpretations. New Relics is an opportunity to engage with these potentials that have come to encapsulate, and exist within, the definition of Sculpture.

 

Thames-Side Studios Gallery

Thames-Side Studios

Harrington Way, Warspite Road

Royal Borough of Greenwich

London SE18 5NR.

 

Thames-Side Studios Gallery open Thursday-Sunday 12-5pm during exhibitions and by appointment.

For general Thames-Side Studios Gallery enquiries please email info@thames-sidestudios.co.uk

New Relics
curated by Tim Ellis and Kate Terry

Exhibition Dates: 2-24 June 2018
Preview: Friday 1 June 2018, 6.30-8.30pm, all welcome.
Special Artists' Opening Event: Saturday 9 June, 12-6pm, all welcome.
Curators' Talk: Saturday 9 June 2018, 3pm, all welcome.

Salvatore Arancio, Vasilis Asmakopoulos, Andy Bannister, Olivia Bax, Dominic Beattie, Katie Bethune-Leamen, Hannah Birkett, Simona Brinkman, Daryl Brown, Hannah Brown, Bettina Buck, Clare Burnett, Matt Calderwood, Stewart Cliff, Lotti V Closs, Benjamin Cohen, Gary Colclough, Katie Cuddon, Blue Curry, Rosalind Davis, Alexander Devereux, Dexter Dymoke, Tim Ellis, Brian Griffiths, Lilah Fowler, Holly Hendry, Justin Hibbs, Fred Hunt, Andrea Jespersen, Paul Johnson, Ana Kazaroff, Vera Kox, Lucy LeFeuvre, Alan Magee, Eva Masterman, Ian Monroe, Rupert Norfolk, Roula Partheniou, Harrison Pearce, Mark Pearson, Chris Poulton, Frances Richardson, Michael Samuels, Alex Scarf, Zoe Schoenherr, Amy Stephens, Karen Tang, Kate Terry, Jonathan Trayte, Finbar Ward, Elaine Wilson, Sarah Kate Wilson, Andrea V Wright, Ben Woodeson

The term relic is used to describe something that has survived the passage of time, especially an object or custom whose original culture has disappeared, but also an object cherished for historical value such as a keepsake or heirloom……

New Relics presents a diverse range of contemporary positions in sculpture from a cross generational group of international artists. The exhibition demonstrates the multiple directions and potentials of sculpture and how it is continually shifting and being reinterpreted. The themes and concepts illustrated show the depth of the medium and the alluring power of materials to conjure new meanings and interpretations. New Relics is an opportunity to engage with these potentials that have come to encapsulate, and exist within, the definition of Sculpture.

Thames-Side Studios Gallery
Thames-Side Studios
Harrington Way, Warspite Road
Royal Borough of Greenwich
London SE18 5NR.

Thames-Side Studios Gallery open Thursday-Sunday 12-5pm during exhibitions and by appointment.
For general Thames-Side Studios Gallery enquiries please email info@thames-sidestudios.co.uk

New Relics

curated by Tim Ellis and Kate Terry

 

Exhibition Dates: 2-24 June 2018

Preview: Friday 1 June 2018, 6.30-8.30pm, all welcome.

Special Artists' Opening Event: Saturday 9 June, 12-6pm, all welcome.

Curators' Talk: Saturday 9 June 2018, 3pm, all welcome.

 

Salvatore Arancio, Vasilis Asmakopoulos, Andy Bannister, Olivia Bax, Dominic Beattie, Katie Bethune-Leamen, Hannah Birkett, Simona Brinkman, Daryl Brown, Hannah Brown, Bettina Buck, Clare Burnett, Matt Calderwood, Stewart Cliff, Lotti V Closs, Benjamin Cohen, Gary Colclough, Katie Cuddon, Blue Curry, Rosalind Davis, Alexander Devereux, Dexter Dymoke, Tim Ellis, Brian Griffiths, Lilah Fowler, Holly Hendry, Justin Hibbs, Fred Hunt, Andrea Jespersen, Paul Johnson, Ana Kazaroff, Vera Kox, Lucy LeFeuvre, Alan Magee, Eva Masterman, Ian Monroe, Rupert Norfolk, Roula Partheniou, Harrison Pearce, Mark Pearson, Chris Poulton, Frances Richardson, Michael Samuels, Alex Scarf, Zoe Schoenherr, Amy Stephens, Karen Tang, Kate Terry, Jonathan Trayte, Finbar Ward, Elaine Wilson, Sarah Kate Wilson, Andrea V Wright, Ben Woodeson

 

The term relic is used to describe something that has survived the passage of time, especially an object or custom whose original culture has disappeared, but also an object cherished for historical value such as a keepsake or heirloom……

 

New Relics presents a diverse range of contemporary positions in sculpture from a cross generational group of international artists. The exhibition demonstrates the multiple directions and potentials of sculpture and how it is continually shifting and being reinterpreted. The themes and concepts illustrated show the depth of the medium and the alluring power of materials to conjure new meanings and interpretations. New Relics is an opportunity to engage with these potentials that have come to encapsulate, and exist within, the definition of Sculpture.

 

Thames-Side Studios Gallery

Thames-Side Studios

Harrington Way, Warspite Road

Royal Borough of Greenwich

London SE18 5NR.

 

Thames-Side Studios Gallery open Thursday-Sunday 12-5pm during exhibitions and by appointment.

For general Thames-Side Studios Gallery enquiries please email info@thames-sidestudios.co.uk

4/5/2018 - CLARA BROERMANN | 6 FARBEN, SCHWARTZ CONTEMPORARY, BERLIN, GERMANY

Exhibition dates: May 4th - June 6th, 2018 Opening: May 3rd, 6 pm   The process of finding an exhibition…

Exhibition dates: May 4th - June 6th, 2018

Opening: May 3rd, 6 pm

 

The process of finding an exhibition title ended with 6 Farben / 6 Colours. It is a concise, clear title that piques our interest, because it sounds like the name of a collection. Are the colours on the painter’s palette meant here? Or the colours of the works in the show? Why six colours? And of course, which colours are they, now for the season of spring/summer 2018?

Looking for associations in connection of the number six and the term colour, some people might think of a rainbow… Some may hoist a rainbow flag in their minds, or remember the Apple logo that was first used in 1977, which played with that combination of colours: the rainbow apple. The technology corporation renewed the patent on this image brand that raises our visual appetite. Gerhard Richter created a painting called Sechs Farben as part of his series of colour chart paintings; that was in 1966. And perhaps someone has tried out Edward de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats [in German: Das Sechsfarbendenken], a training model for structuring thinking – which uses six differently coloured hats. But what hides behind Clara Brörmann’s six colours? In her catalogue from 2016, we read the following:

For me, colour is a material with which I work. Colour is plastic, it has a body. My choice is dictated by criteria such as opaque, transparent, flat, deep, warm, cold, or contrasting. I rarely use brash, loud colours, and not really ever artificial ones like neon paints; I don’t want them to push themselves too much into the foreground. I never mix my paints; I use them as they come from the tube. But the layering results in a mixture. (Clara Brörmann in conversation with Christine Nippe, p. 15)

If we take this literally, for Clara Brörmann the materiality of colour(s) and their material qualities seem to be at the centre, and less their psychological effect or connection to certain objects or shapes. Thus, we may perhaps understand her paintings first and foremost as image complexes, and colour as their building material – if we were inclined to use such a metaphor. For years now, the artist has been developing her mainly abstract paintings, which often play with ornamentation, in a (self-)disruptive process without a previous building plan and – these days, that is almost worth mentioning – without any digital aids. Her works are created in a dialogue between her an whatever colours and paints she has on the canvas below or in front of her, depending on whether the latter is on the floor or leans against the wall. In the back of her mind, she has, of course, as capital her considerable practical experience and her art historical pictorial memory. That means the result – the finished motif, where we can trace the steps of the artist almost physically, how she paints over, scrapes, rips, or works systematically with the attractive or repellent or other special qualities of certain kinds of paints such as ink or pure pigments – develops in her actions. Standing in her studio in front of her paintings, one almost imagines that they emerged of their own accord, on their own from the canvas, like in a process of maturation, since we can see that below the paintings there are heaps of paint chippings on the floor. And that is rather reminiscent of leaves or perhaps even more of the bark that sycamore trees regularly shed – which leaves a peculiar, also multilayered colour pattern on their trunks.

But we are losing sight of the thread in red here: what exactly is up with Clara Brörmann’s six colours of the title? I can tell you that much: the six (!) paintings in the exhibition, all of them portrait formats measuring 170 x 120 cm, are each named after a colour, such as blau, gelb, weiß - blue, yellow, white. These are, which has been typical for the artist, once again no monochromes; rather, the colour that dominates the painting is the one that is named. And there are actually hints of figurative elements – including the motif of a wave, a leaf, or a flame – mixed into the abstraction. So the colours do have symbolic value here. From the process of finding a title, the author vaguely remembers that they might potentially point in the direction of the elements: water, fire… A concrete assignation is left to the beholder, if he or she is so inclined. And those who are not quite green behind the ears will recognise some art historical references. The six colours are ready for inspection.

Text: Barbara Buchmaier

27/4/2018 - ISHMAEL RANDALL WEEKS | A COSA SERVE L'UTOPIA, GALLERIA CIVICA DI MODENA, MODENA, ITALY

Exhibition dates: April 28th - July 22nd, 2018 Opening: April 27th, 6.00 pm   A cosa serve l'utopia a cura…

Exhibition dates: April 28th - July 22nd, 2018

Opening: April 27th, 6.00 pm

 

A cosa serve l'utopia

a cura di Chiara Dall’Olio e Daniele De Luigi

Galleria Civica di Modena

Sale superiori, Palazzo Santa Margherita

Corso Canalgrande 103, Modena

Inaugura venerdì 27 aprile 2018 alle ore 18 alla Galleria Civica di Modena la mostra A cosa serve l’utopia, a cura di Chiara Dall’Olio e Daniele De Luigi, prodotta da FONDAZIONE MODENA ARTI VISIVE nell’ambito del festival Fotografia Europea dedicato quest’anno al tema “RIVOLUZIONI. Ribellioni, cambiamenti, utopie.”

Il titolo della mostra è tratto dal paragrafo “Finestra sull’utopia” del volume Parole in cammino di Eduardo Galeano (1940-2015). Lo scrittore uruguaiano descrive l’utopia come un orizzonte mai raggiungibile, che si allontana da noi di tanti passi quanti ne facciamo. Chiedendosi “a cosa serve l’utopia”, si risponde “a camminare”.

Coniato nel Cinquecento da Thomas More, il termine utopia è passato progressivamente nel corso dei secoli a indicare non solo un luogo astratto o irraggiungibile, ma anche un progetto di società possibile, in cui perseguire obiettivi concreti come l’uguaglianza sociale, i diritti universali, la pace mondiale. Le rivoluzioni del Novecento ne hanno delineato una duplice natura: da una parte sogno concreto, speranza nel cambiamento, fiducia nel futuro; dall’altra capovolgimento in distopia, un modello di società che reprime le libertà dell’uomo e lascia un’amara disillusione verso gli ideali infranti o traditi.

La mostra esplora la tensione tra queste due dimensioni attraverso una selezione di fotografie e video di artisti e fotografi italiani e internazionali, provenienti dai patrimoni collezionistici gestiti da FONDAZIONE MODENA ARTI VISIVE e appartenenti alla Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Modena e al Comune di Modena/Galleria Civica, nello specifico la Raccolta della Fotografia avviata nel 1991 con la donazione della raccolta dell’artista e fotografo modenese Franco Fontana.

Le opere delle collezioni modenesi sono poste in dialogo con una serie di immagini scelte dagli archivi della Magnum, la prestigiosa agenzia fondata a New York e Parigi nel 1947 da Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa, George Rodger e David Chim Seymour. Le fotografie Magnum, stampate su grande formato, ritraggono attraverso l’occhio di celebri fotoreporter come Abbas, Bruno Barbey, Ian Berry e Alex Majoli, momenti culminanti di rivolta divenuti iconici nell’immaginario collettivo come il Sessantotto a Parigi e Tokyo, la caduta del Muro di Berlino nel 1989, oppure il movimento per i diritti civili negli Stati Uniti negli anni Sessanta fino alla Primavera araba.

A cosa serve l’utopia istituisce una duplice dialettica: quella tra la ciclica alternanza di costruzione e frantumazione di un ideale, ma anche un dialogo serrato tra immagini create per differenti scopi — le une usate per raccontare a caldo sui media l’attualità politica, le altre per riflettere a freddo su fallimenti e cambiamenti, eredità e prospettive — che dà vita a un confronto tra pratiche fotografiche apparentemente contrastanti eppure profondamente connesse.

Il percorso espositivo inizia con uno scatto emblematico del 1968 in cui studenti parigini, fotografati da Bruno Barbey si passano di mano in mano dei sampietrini. Segue Omaggio ad Artaud di Franco Vaccari che celebra il potere dell’invenzione linguistica di far immaginare ciò che non esiste, e prosegue con alcune immagini evocative dell’utopia comunista: dopo la gigantografia di Lenin fotografata da Mario De Biasi a Leningrado (1972), appare l’immagine creata dal rumeno Josif Király di alcuni ragazzi che nel 2006 passano il tempo libero seduti su una statua abbattuta del leader sovietico. Piazza San Venceslao a Praga nel 1968, fotografata da Ian Berry e gremita di giovani che si ribellavano all’occupazione russa, fa da contraltare alle opere che mostrano la sorte beffarda che subiscono talvolta le icone delle rivoluzioni: è il caso della serie Animal Farm (2007) della ceca Swetlana Heger, che mostra sculture di animali presenti nei parchi di Berlino le quali, secondo le informazioni raccolte dall'artista, sarebbero state realizzate con il bronzo della monumentale statua di Stalin rimossa nel 1961 dalla Karl-Marx-Allee; oppure di Sale of Dictatorship (1997-2000) dello slavo Mladen Stilnović, in cui i ritratti di Tito passano dalle vetrine dei negozi alle bancarelle dei mercatini di memorabilia.

Il percorso prosegue con alcune immagini riferite al Medioriente e ai suoi conflitti mai sanati: da quello iraniano con la rivoluzione khomeinista, testimoniata da uno scatto di Abbas nel 1978 e la rilettura fatta di quegli eventi in Rock, Paper, Scissors (2009) da Jinoos Taghizadeh — che marca l’enorme distanza che separa speranze di cambiamento e realtà — al conflitto israelo-palestinese, evocato dalle torri militari di avvistamento presenti in Cisgiordania che Taysir Batniji ha chiesto di documentare clandestinamente a un fotografo palestinese (2008), fino alle lettere che un detenuto libanese, imprigionato durante l’occupazione israeliana nel Libano meridionale, ha inviato dal carcere ai suoi cari e che Akram Zaatari ha fotografato nel lavoro Books of letters from family and friends (2007). Completa questo gruppo di opere uno scatto di Charles Steele-Perkins che racconta proprio quei disordini del 1982.

La difesa della memoria storica intesa non solo come un omaggio alle vittime delle ingiustizie passate, ma anche come un atto di resistenza contro quelle future, è presente nella ricerca condotta in Cile da Patrick Zachmann sui luoghi teatro dei crimini del regime di Pinochet. Una serie di ritratti (tra gli altri di Francesco Jodice, Luis Poirot, Melina Mulas) incarnano altrettante e diverse forme di resistenza attive e passive, che si oppongono tanto a brutali repressioni quanto a forme di segregazione o controllo sociale in Tibet come in Giappone o in Tunisia. Due fotografie del 1963 di Leonard Freed rappresentano il sogno di uguaglianza del Movimento per i diritti civili in America. Il breve video dell’artista di origini peruviane Ishmael Randall Weeks rende onore, con una poetica metafora, a chi lotta per non cadere. Le opere di Filippo Minelli e del collettivo Zelle Asphaltkultur, pur frutto di azioni artistiche assai differenti (l’innesco di fumogeni colorati in contesti naturali idilliaci il primo, la realizzazione illegale di grafiche di esplosioni su vagoni ferroviari il secondo), sfruttano l’immaginario comune legato ai disordini e alla violenza per riflettere sul senso che esso assume nel mondo contemporaneo. La mostra si chiude con una delle utopie oggi più diffuse, quella pacifista, che proietta sull'intera comunità umana il sogno dell’assenza di conflitto e di una fratellanza universale. Il video di Yael Bartana A Declaration (2006) in cui un uomo a bordo di un’imbarcazione approda su uno scoglio dove campeggia una bandiera israeliana e la sostituisce con un albero di ulivo, sembra indicarci ciò che è necessario per perseguire questo ideale: visionarietà, coraggio, simboli condivisi, poesia.

Galleria Civica di Modena e Fondazione Fotografia Modena fanno parte – insieme a Museo della Figurina – di FONDAZIONE MODENA ARTI VISIVE, istituzione diretta da Diana Baldon e dedicata alla presentazione e alla promozione dell'arte e delle culture visive contemporanee.

Con opere di: Abbas, Bruno Barbey, Yael Bartana, Taysir Batniji, Ian Berry, Fabio Boni, Mario De Biasi, Leonard Freed, Paula Haro Poniatowska, Swetlana Heger, Alejandro Hoppe, Jorge Ianiszewski, Francesco Jodice, Iosif Király, Alex Majoli, Filippo Minelli, Daido Moriyama, Melina Mulas, Oscar Navarro, Ulises Nilo, Luis Poirot, Mark Power, Ishmael Randall Weeks, Aldo Soligno, Chris Steele-Perkins, Mladen Stilinović, Jinoos Taghizadeh, Franco Vaccari, Pedro Valtierra, Akram Zaatari, Patrick Zachmann, Zelle Asphaltkultur.

14/4/2018 - PATRICK TUTTOFUOCO | HETEROCHROMIC (ROSA E CARLO), GALLERIA CRACCO, MILAN, ITALY

Exhibition Dates: April 14th - September 30th, 2018 L’innovativo ristorante di Carlo Cracco in Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II a Milano…

Exhibition Dates: April 14th - September 30th, 2018

L’innovativo ristorante di Carlo Cracco in Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II a Milano si lega all’arte
e alla creatività inaugurando, venerdì 13 aprile 2018, Galleria Cracco by Sky Arte, un progetto
che nasce con la volontà di coinvolgere una serie di artisti italiani contemporanei nel realizzare
tre volte l’anno interventi site specific per le “lunette” che sovrastano le vetrine del ristorante
dello chef stellato.
Galleria Cracco è un progetto nato dall’idea dello chef insieme all’agenzia di comunicazione
Paridevitale e a Sky Arte HD, il primo canale televisivo dedicato all’arte in tutte le sue forme.
Saranno tre vetrine d’arte con una vocazione “pubblica”, fruibile 24 ore su 24, e gratuitamente,
da tutti coloro che attraverseranno la Galleria Vittorio Emanuele, luogo simbolo di Milano, che vede
oltre 100.000 visitatori al giorno.
Patrick Tuttofuoco: Heterochromic (Rosa e Carlo)
La prima installazione site specific ad inaugurare Galleria Cracco è Heterochromic (Rosa e
Carlo) dell’artista Patrick Tuttofuoco, risultato di una riflessione intimamente legata al concetto
di identità.
“Nella mia ricerca sono sempre interessato al fenomeno della ‘polarità’; che si tratti di dicotomia o
fusione, quello che cerco di fare è indagare quei fenomeni secondo cui dalla giustapposizione di
due elementi prende vita una forma sola, un concetto unico, visibile e comprensibile”, afferma
Patrick Tuttofuoco. “In Heterochromic i due elementi su cui mi sono trovato a riflettere sono Carlo
Cracco e Rosa Fanti, sua compagna di vita nel senso più ampio, e di come le due identità uomo e
donna si possano fondere in un progetto così importante”.

L’innovativo ristorante di Carlo Cracco in Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II a Milano si lega all’arte e alla creatività inaugurando, venerdì 13 aprile 2018, Galleria Cracco by Sky Arte, un progetto che nasce con la volontà di coinvolgere una serie di artisti italiani contemporanei nel realizzare tre volte l’anno interventi site specific per le “lunette” che sovrastano le vetrine del ristorante dello chef stellato.

Galleria Cracco è un progetto nato dall’idea dello chef insieme all’agenzia di comunicazione Paridevitale e a Sky Arte HD, il primo canale televisivo dedicato all’arte in tutte le sue forme. Saranno tre vetrine d’arte con una vocazione “pubblica”, fruibile 24 ore su 24, e gratuitamente, da tutti coloro che attraverseranno la Galleria Vittorio Emanuele, luogo simbolo di Milano, che vede oltre 100.000 visitatori al giorno.

La prima installazione site specific ad inaugurare Galleria Cracco è Heterochromic (Rosa e Carlo) dell’artista Patrick Tuttofuoco, risultato di una riflessione intimamente legata al concetto di identità. “Nella mia ricerca sono sempre interessato al fenomeno della ‘polarità’; che si tratti di dicotomia o fusione, quello che cerco di fare è indagare quei fenomeni secondo cui dalla giustapposizione di due elementi prende vita una forma sola, un concetto unico, visibile e comprensibile”, afferma Patrick Tuttofuoco. “In Heterochromic i due elementi su cui mi sono trovato a riflettere sono Carlo Cracco e Rosa Fanti, sua compagna di vita nel senso più ampio, e di come le due identità uomo e donna si possano fondere in un progetto così importante”.

L’artista ha trasformato così due lunette di Galleria Cracco in due occhi, quello di Carlo e di Rosa, rendendoli come parti di uno stesso individuo: è l’evocazione di un’entità unica che presenta iridi diverse – da qui il titolo dell’opera, Heterochromic, rimando alla caratteristica somatica che causa in una stessa persona occhi dai colori differenti. L’artista con questo lavoro pone dichiaratamente l’attenzione su come la singolarità possa comporre un organismo unico, pur garantendone un’identità mista, non gerarchica, rizomatica, anche confusa a tratti, ma sicuramente più aperta e densa.

La scelta di rappresentare la vista deriva dalla forte condivisione tra Tuttofuoco e Cracco di questo senso nelle rispettive ricerche: l’artista e lo chef infatti – seppur con strumenti diversi – sono legati da una comune ricerca in termini estetici e dal conseguente impulso-bisogno di comunicarla, condividerla, renderla assaporabile anche dagli altri. La riflessione di Tuttofuoco, inoltre, non ha potuto non coinvolgere il contesto: la Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II infatti è un luogo pieno di carattere, chiaramente identificabile, un’altra identità forte con cui è stato inevitabile misurarsi. La peculiarità artistica e architettonica della Galleria, insieme alla cura del progetto di restauro del Ristorante Cracco, hanno diretto l’artista nella scelta del media da usare per questo lavoro. Heterochromic (Rosa e Carlo) si compone quindi di neon, materiale – unico nella sua specificità –, dalla dichiarata connotazione artigianale, poetica, elegante, protagonista contemporaneo, eppure allo stesso tempo tradizionale, della storia dell’arte più recente.

Ospitando Galleria Cracco, il nuovo ristorante di Carlo Cracco conferma ulteriormente la sua volontà di porsi come un luogo di sperimentazione, in cui la creatività diventa il fil rouge tra il food – in primis –, l’architettura, il design, l’arte: è l’eccellenza del saper fare italiano, declinata in forme diverse, la vera protagonista.

In occasione di miart, la ventitreesima edizione della fiera internazionale d’arte moderna e contemporanea di Milano, Patrick Tuttofuoco sarà inoltre protagonista in fiera di un allestimento presso il booth C26 Pad 3 della galleria Federica Schiavo Gallery.

 

2/4/2018 - SALVATORE ARANCIO | IS THIS PLANET EARTH?, TY PAWB, WREXHAM, UK

Opening April 2nd, 2018April 3 - June 24, 2018 In Is This Planet Earth? visitors will encounter wondrous creatures and…

Opening April 2nd, 2018
April 3 - June 24, 2018

In Is This Planet Earth? visitors will encounter wondrous creatures and stunning landscapes – and every colour and sensation will be heightened and very strange. Beautiful to behold and often sci-fi in feel, the exhibition will have darker undercurrents, too, relating to our destruction of nature.

There will be sculptures by Salvatore Arancio, Halina Dominska and Alfie Strong, paintings by Dan Hays and Katherine Reekie, a sound installation by Jason Singh, a live performance by Patrick Coyle and videos by Helen Sear and Seán Vicary. Tim Pugh will be artist in residence. The exhibition is curated by Angela Kingston.

More on: https://www.typawb.wales

Artists

14/2/2018 - JAY HEIKES | MATRIX 269, BERKELEY ART MUSEUM AND PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE, BERKELEY, USA

Exhibition dates: February 14th - April 29th, 2018 Many of the objects—paintings, sculptures, and drawings—presented in this exhibition were informed…

Exhibition dates: February 14th - April 29th, 2018

Many of the objects—paintings, sculptures, and drawings—presented in this exhibition were informed by time Jay Heikes (b. 1975) spent at a residency in Marfa, Texas, in early 2017. The dry, crumbly terrain of the desert landscape and the site’s proximity to Mexico inspired his rumination and reflection on the significance of borders to our culture, a subject that has concurrently received much attention in the political sphere. The exhibition features two large-scale copper sculptures that loosely conjure fences. Yet instead of delimiting territory, the sculptures appear tenuous and ornamental, alluding to the fact that they define a metaphorical space rather than an actual one. The sculptures are complemented by a selection of paintings from Heikes’s Z series, which he developed as a way to signal the end of language, implied by his invocation of the last letter of the alphabet. Additional drawings and sculptures extend his application of similar motifs. Together, the works embody the artist’s longing for transcendence amid the deluge of negative media in the wake of the presidential election.

The son of a chemist, Heikes grew up fascinated by the sense of magic inherent in scientific experimentation and discovery. This experience is apparent in his interest in alchemy and the diverse material processes embedded in his artistic practice. “I feel we’re on trend to shortchange the art object,” Heikes has said. “We’re not giving it its due and I want to challenge that a little bit.” In addition to activating a reflection on our cultural moment, the works in MATRIX 269 highlight Heikes’s commitment to the material properties of the art object, and his probing of the potential of his diverse media and subjects.

More on: https://bampfa.org/program/jay-heikes-matrix-269